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Caltabellotta

Villas in Sicily near Caltabellotta

CaltabellottaThe caves scattered around the territory of Caltabellotta and its proximities witness the presence of Sicans - a native Sicilian population - since III millennium B.C. This primitive settlement was probably named Inycon, but around the XIII century B.C. - under the rule of famous king Kocalos - the place was renamed Kamikos.

After the Sicans, the rock and the surrounding lands were certainly inhabited by the Phoenicians, undoubtedly not indifferent to the strategic importance of the place. They came to Sicily from actual Palestine around VIII century B.C., and imported their customs and religion here, human sacrifices to their divinities included. Their bloody cult is also witnessed in Mothya, and it survived during the Sicilian Greeks' expansion on this area. In fact, groups of Greeks moved here from Eastern Sicily around the V century B.C., attracted by the three "virtues" (trias kala in Greek) of the land: fertility of soil, richness of water and a privileged position. The settlement was therefore named Triokala. The cult of Greek god Kronos also requested the sacrifice of small children, so the Phoenician rites survived until Christian age.

Around 258 B.C. during the First Punic War, the Romans destroyed Triokala, and the inhabitants moved to the near Trokalis, actual S. Anna, 7 km away. The ancient Inycon/Kamikos/Triokala was again inhabited during the Slave Wars, when bands of rebel slaves chose the rock to resist the siege of Romans, between 104 and 99 B.C. The last 1000 slaves surviving to the siege finally surrendered, and were brought to Rome to fight as gladiators. But once arrived there, they killed one another to escape their sad fate. The rock was again deserted for a long time. [ + ]

Villas in Sicily near Caltabellotta

Caltabellotta

Caltabellotta by night

Caltabellotta cathedral

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